Donald F. Burke Article Archives

The Employee Free Choice Act – Redux

January, 2009 | By Donald F. Burke

New companion bills placed in the Congressional hopper, designated as H.R. 1409 and S. 560, constitute an amendment to the National Labor Relations Act, designated the Employee Free Choice Act of 2009 (EFCA). View Article The above publication is saved in PDF format. You will need the free Adobe Acrobat Reader to view this document.

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Ten Practical Hiring Tips

September, 2002 | By Donald F. Burke

The hiring process is more perilous today than ever before. Employers must comply with a myriad of competing federal, state and local laws prohibiting discrimination, and also laws such as the Americans With Disabilities Act (“ADA”) which significantly limit what health related questions an employer may ask applicants. Employers who fail to exercise due care in selecting employees risk costly lawsuits, including suits initiated by patients. Medical practices must find ways to recruit, hire and retain qualified employees while avoiding a minefield of potential claims. This article will outline ten hiring tips, knowledge of which will help you to practice preventive action and thereby minimize risks associated with the hiring process.

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Legal Risks To The Employer In The Electronic Workplace And How To Avoid Them

March, 2002 | By Donald F. Burke

(Labor & Employment Newsletter – 2002) While there are both federal and Maryland laws which address privacy there are few which explicitly address privacy rights in today’s complex and sophisticated electronic workplace. View Article The above publication is saved in PDF format. You will need the free Adobe Acrobat Reader to view this document.

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Preparing a Workplace Violence Prevention Program

June, 2000 | By Donald F. Burke

Recent shootings in Georgia (9 killed in July), Alabama (3 killed in August) and Hawaii (7 killed in November) are a chilling reminder of the vulnerability of America’s workplace. These are the high profile cases which make the nightly news. The sobering truth is that in the United States, homicide is the second leading cause of death in the workplace. For women, it is the leading cause of workplace fatality. Each day in the workplace three people are killed and sixty-one are seriously injured. The attackers are often coworkers, customers, or patients.

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